What Is the Average Life Expectancy of a Chinese Pug Puppy?

by Jeff Katz
    The small, but sturdy pug originated in China and is now a common breed throughout North America.

    The small, but sturdy pug originated in China and is now a common breed throughout North America.

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    The pug, described by the Pug Dog Club of America as "one of the most wonderful dogs in the world," is a breed known for being playful, even-tempered and extraordinarily loyal. Though relatively compact in size, pugs are also quite hearty and strong and it is estimated that the average life span of a healthy pug is from the mid- to high teens.

    Helping Your Pug Live a Long Life

    One important fact to keep in mind, according to PetMD.com, is that pugs are "prone to major health problems," particularly in terms of the skin and respiratory system. Therefore, to help your pug live a long life, it is necessary to keep a watchful eye on your pug's physical well-being. Regular visits to the vet are critical, nails should be kept short, eyes and ears should be kept clean, and the face, particularly the "nose roll," should be washed every day.

    More Health Tips

    Diet, too, is extremely important. Pugs love to eat and, as a result, many pugs become overweight. Overeating and excessive weight may present serious problems. Overfeeding should be avoided. Also, pugs are very sensitive to temperature extremes. This means that your pug should be kept as cool as possible in the hotter months and should not be exposed to frigid weather for extended periods of time. Being conscientious about health means a higher likelihood of a happy 12 to 18 years.

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    About the Author

    Jeff Katz has been a professional librarian, educator, historian, writer and editor for almost 20 years. He holds a Master of Library Science degree from the University of British Columbia and a BA degree in Classical Studies from Hunter College of the City University of New York.

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