Bathing a Dog Without Water

by Susan Revermann Google
    Not all dogs sit so serenely in a tub of soapy water.

    Not all dogs sit so serenely in a tub of soapy water.

    Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images

    Your dog may downright loathe getting a traditional bath. Since you can’t just do away with the whole idea of grooming your pooch, you can actually clean her without plopping her into a bucket of water. This will help keep her from smelling like a garbage bin and she’ll look better, too.

    Step 1

    Use a slicker brush to give your pooch a good brushing. You will get rid of dirt, debris, bugs and loose hair from her coat. Regular brushing also helps reduce tangles and mats from a pooch’s fur, thus making it easier to bath her, with or without water and shampoo.

    Step 2

    Wipe her paws down with a damp washcloth or baby wipes. Gently wipe around her claws and in the crevices of her paws.

    Step 3

    Grab a damp cotton ball and wipe her eye from the inner edge out. Throw that cotton ball away and grab a new one for the other eye.

    Step 4

    Sprinkle some baking soda all over your doggie’s fur, except the face and eye areas, and massage it into her fur and skin with your fingertips. Brush the baking soda out.

    Step 5

    Purchase a waterless dog bath. These can be found online or at your local pet store. Several manufacturers offer this product in an array of scents and they vary by cost. They come in foam, spray or powder form. Read the instructions and warning labels before starting. Apply waterless dog bath to your dog’s fur and massage it in well, starting by her head and working your way back from there.

    Items You Will Need

    • Slicker brush
    • Washcloths or baby wipes
    • Cotton balls
    • Baking soda
    • Waterless bath

    Tips

    • Talk to your dog softly as you do this to keep her calm and as still as you can. Praise her for good behavior and offer small treats as you go along.
    • Give her some special love, attention and petting after you’re done. This will make it a pleasant and rewarding experience for her and she’ll be less likely to fidget or be scared during future bathing or grooming experiences.

    Photo Credits

    • Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Susan Revermann is a professional writer with educational and professional experience in psychology, research and teaching. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Washington in psychology, focused on research, motivational behavior and statistics. Revermann also has a background in art, crafts, green living, outdoor activities and overall fitness, balance and well-being.

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