How Do I Break the Habit If My Rottweiler Tries to Scare People but Doesn't Bite?

by Megan Smith
    Curb your Rottweiler's aggressive tendencies early on.

    Curb your Rottweiler's aggressive tendencies early on.

    Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

    Rottweilers are large dogs that have a reputation for being aggressive. Because Rottweilers can be fiercely protective of their owners, if they are not properly trained, that protective tendency can lead to aggressive behaviors. When your Rottweiler is displaying aggressive behavior toward people, such as barking, snarling or growling, but has never bitten anyone, you can likely curb the actions through careful training. Be aware that Rottweilers are headstrong, determined dogs, so you need to be a strong leader so that the dog will respect you. With proper training, Rottweilers can make great family dogs.

    Step 1

    Socialize your Rottweiler so that it becomes used to being around people. Introduce the dog to all kinds of other people, including men, women, children, old people, active people, loud people and quiet people. That way, the dog will become used to people who are different from you. Allow the people to be close to you, touch you and walk up to you in front of the dog. Keep the dog leashed so that it does not become aggressive and correct any barking or other actions with a stern "no." Socialize the dog with other dogs and cats as well.

    Step 2

    Educate the people around about how to treat the dog. They should not hit it, shout at it or do anything else that will make it mistrust humans. Tell your friends and family members that they also should not fear the dog. It can likely smell the fear and will feel more dominant. If you fear that your Rottweiler might bite someone, place a muzzle on it when it is around people.

    Step 3

    Become dominant over your Rottweiler. Rottweilers are a strong breeds and the dogs can easily become convinced that they are the boss. Control everything about the dog, such as when it goes for walks, when it urinates or defecates, when it gets to interact with people or other dogs, when it gets to play with its toys and when it can eat. This is not mistreating the dog. This will cause the dog to respect you and see you as its master.

    Step 4

    Correct any aggressive behavior the dog displays toward a person or another dog by giving it a firm "no" and making it sit. If the dog cannot be trusted to remain in a seated position, keep it leashed when it is around people.

    Step 5

    Hire a professional trainer if your efforts are not rewarded within a few weeks. Correcting aggressive behaviors is important, so do not let your Rottweiler's aggression go unchecked.

    Photo Credits

    • Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Megan Smith started writing professionally in 2003. She has written for newspapers such as the "Anniston Star" and the "Anderson Independent-Mail." Smith has a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism and a Master of Arts degree in communications from the University of Alabama.

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