Can Dogs Have Cabbage?

by Naomi Millburn
    Breathe easy -- cabbage is safe for canines.

    Breathe easy -- cabbage is safe for canines.

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    If your precious pooch always has a longing look in his deep eyes as he watches you dine on cabbage at dinnertime, don't automatically rule the stuff out as an extremely occasional canine treat. Cabbage is 100 percent harmless for dogs. Your hungry pet is in luck.

    Not only is cabbage safe for dogs, it offers nutritional benefits to your furry friends, according to Viva Pets. Although dogs are natural meat eaters, consumption of greens such as cabbage, lettuce, spinach, kale and celery offers valuable vitamin content for them. Never make the presumption that canines don't have any need for vegetables.

    Although cabbage is canine-friendly, be aware that the veggie may induce excess gas in some dogs, with uncomfortable and unpleasant symptoms such as belly ache, watery stool and flatulence -- no, thank you. Because of this possibility, allow your pet to eat only a very minimal amount of cabbage -- one tiny bite, for starters. If you observe any signs of gas, call a moratorium on cabbage and head for the hills. Other vegetables that may trigger gas in your dog are broccoli, kale, cauliflower and asparagus. Be careful not only for your pooch but for the sake of your nose, too.

    Apart from giving your cutie a jolt of beneficial vitamins, cabbage supplies other health advantages. According to the Partnership for Animal Welfare organization, cabbage is useful for keeping both your pet's skin and gastrointestinal system in good working order.

    Although cabbage is OK for your dog to eat once in a while, in no way are all vegetables and fruits safe. In fact, some vegetables and fruits that are completely harmless to human beings are a major hazard to dogs. These risky vegetables include onions and garlic, avocados and grapes. Keep all of these far from your doggie's mouth. Never offer your pet any type of food made for people unless you get the approval of your veterinarian beforehand -- a food that might not harm him could be too fibrous, causing bowel irregularity.

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    About the Author

    Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

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