Can Puppies Get the Herpes Virus?

by Naomi Millburn
    If he seems under the water, contact the vet, pronto.

    If he seems under the water, contact the vet, pronto.

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    Canine herpesvirus is an infection that can affect puppies -- it actually is often fatal for them. The virus is frequently called "fading puppy syndrome," a description of some of its danger. Not only can puppies get canine herpesvirus, so can fully mature dogs.

    This virus resides within the respiratory and reproductive systems of canines of both genders. Dogs frequently get the infection through close exposure to affected individuals, whether via touching, face-licking, sneezing, mating acts or anything of that sort. When wee puppies get the herpes virus, they often get it from their mothers, sometimes while they're still inside the womb. Puppies occasionally can even catch the infection in the midst of labor, as a result of the presence of the virus in vaginal discharge. Nasal discharge can also lead to infection.

    If you are concerned that a puppy might have canine herpes virus, contact a veterinarian immediately. Time is precious in these situations, so don't wait around for even a minute. Puppies with the ailment often display a variety of symptoms, but neonates sometimes pass away from it immediately, with absolutely no hint of it beforehand. Some signs of the condition are exhaustion, bloody nose, runny nose, no appetite, whimpering, stomach rash, bruises over the belly region and elsewhere, problems breathing and runny stools that are green or yellowish. Unlike puppies, mature dogs who have canine herpesvirus frequently don't exhibit symptoms at all. Miscarriages and stillbirths are prevalent in expectant mother dogs who have canine herpesvirus.

    If one puppy has herpesvirus, he could easily and quickly give it to his siblings. However, one puppy having the illness does not necessarily indicate that any or all of his littermates do. Because of this, it is important to separate puppies with the virus from their siblings. It is also important to thoroughly and extensively clean anything the ill puppy touched.

    Puppies are at their highest vulnerability to the canine herpesvirus when they're less than 7 days old, according to the Merck Veterinary Manual. Deaths from canine herpesvirus mostly happen in youngsters who are between 1 and 3 weeks old. Puppies a month in age or younger also occasionally pass away from the condition. If they are a little older, their odds of getting past the virus are a lot higher. If you think that any dog -- puppy or adult -- might have this virus, get veterinary assistance without wasting any time.

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    About the Author

    Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

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