Can You Rub Dogs' Fur With Dryer Sheets?

by Naomi Millburn
Keep the dryer sheets off your cutie's coat.

Keep the dryer sheets off your cutie's coat.

Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

If your dog's shedding is causing your home to look like the floor of a beauty salon, you can manage the issue by frequently and regularly giving his coat a thorough brushing. Don't use dryer sheets. Rubbing dryer sheets on your pet to minimizing shedding can be hazardous.

Hazardous

Dryer sheets, also known as fabric softener sheets, are indeed a danger to both dogs and cats. The sheets are especially problematic the more detergent they contain, so if they're unused, they're even more harmful. The ASPCA warns that dryer sheets consist of cationics, a type of cleansing agent that can seriously irritate a pet's digestive system. Because of the risk thereov, never rub your pet's fur using dryer sheets.

Symptoms

If your dog happens to lick his coat after exposure to dryer sheets, he may experience symptoms of cationic distress. Signs include loss of appetite, excessive salivation and burning of the mouth. In especially severe circumstances, digestive tract ulcers may even be a possibility. Seek veterinary assistance for your pet as soon as possible if you notice any indication of these symptoms -- the quicker the better.

Cats

Definitely dangerous to the canine species, dryer sheets are particularly harmful to felines. Cats are more vulnerable to the hazards of the chemical agents in fabric softener sheets; compounding the risk is the fact that they lick their fur more frequently than dogs due to their meticulous self-grooming routines. Be safe and smart. Keep dryer sheets out of reach of any pets in your household, period.

Shedding

Shedding is just one normal and healthy aspect of being a dog. Although shedding is inevitable, you can minimize the appearance of pesky loose hairs throughout your home by diligently and regularly brushing them out of your pet's coat using a comb. Aim to conduct a brushing session with your pooch once or twice a week if not more frequently. Depending on your fluff ball's coat type, you may need to use a specific brush or comb. If you're uncertain, consult your veterinarian for detailed recommendations.

Photo Credits

  • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

About the Author

Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

Trending Dog Grooming Articles

Have a question? Get an answer from a Vet now!