How to Clean Dog Urine Stains Off Block Walls

by Deborah Lundin
    Block wall staining is unsightly; it can be malodorous, too.

    Block wall staining is unsightly; it can be malodorous, too.

    Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

    They're sturdy, they're simple, they're cheap. But block walls, common for basement walls or foundations, are often unsealed. The porous building material, -- concrete masonry units, cinder blocks or other -- easily absorbs dog urine, leaving stains and odor. To keep a block wall odor- and stain-free, remove the stains and seal the wall.

    Step 1

    Soak up liquid urine from the concrete with paper towels, changing to fresh ones until the area's dry. Scrub the block wall with the scrub brush to remove dirt, dust and other debris.

    Step 2

    Spray the wall with an enzyme-based cleaning spray. The enzymes work to break down urine, removing the stain and odor. An unsealed block wall will absorb the spray, so you need to apply enough to saturate the block. Don't be surprised if you have to spray layer after layer. Cover the block surface with a plastic tarp to reduce the cleaner evaporation. Leave it covered and let the cleaner dry completely. Repeat this step if necessary.

    Step 3

    Seal the concrete block wall with a silicate-based concrete sealer by pouring sealer into a paint tray and applying it to the wall with a paint roller or brush. Allow it to dry according to the manufacturer’s directions before applying a second coat. The finished surface should repel urine, making it much easier to clean. Don't let urine stand, though. Wipe it up immediately, and apply enzymatic cleaner to keep pets from thinking the block wall is a urine depository.

    Items You Will Need

    • Paper towels
    • Scrub brush
    • Enzyme-based cleaning spray
    • Plastic tarp
    • Silicate concrete sealer
    • Paint tray
    • Paint roller or paintbrush

    Tips

    • If your block wall is already sealed, soak up the urine with paper towel and clean with an enzyme cleaner to ensure you take care of removing the odor. While you may not detect the urine odor, your dog will and may choose to use the spot again.
    • Choose a colored concrete sealer to add color and cover up stubborn stains.

    Warning

    • Do not use commercial cleaning products or hot water to treat urine stains and odors; these can actually set the stain, making it more difficult to treat and remove. Enzymatic cleaners are more expensive than common household cleaners; ultimately they're cheaper, since they're the only way to wholly rid a space of urine residue and they passively deter a dog from peeing in the same spot repeatedly because a scent remains.

    Photo Credits

    • Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Deborah Lundin has worked as a professional writer since 2005, though writing has always been a passion. She brings a background in health and fitness, veterinary care, professional cooking and parenting. She studied medical laboratory science and sociology at Northern Illinois University. Sites published on include Yahoo, Physorg and MedicalXPress.

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