How to Clean an Outdoor Kennel

by Dondi Ratliff

To maintain a dog's health as well as to allay concerns about sanitation, you need to clean any regularly used outdoor dog runs and pens at least once a week. If the outdoor pens are infrequently used, cleaning them once a month suffices. The actual cleaning requires a moderate amount of work; it won't be overly strenuous unless you have many runs or particularly large ones.

Cleaning the Outdoor Kennel

Step 1

Remove the dog from the kennel and place him into a secure location away from the cleaning. Remove all dog toys and bowls, as well as sleeping mats or houses, from the kennel. Disinfect and clean these items with soap, water and bleach. Discard leftover treats or food items rather than replace them as-is. Discard old and worn-out toys.

Step 2

Remove all waste from the kennel. Collect the solid waste for disposal in a container using a rake, plastic baggie or other tool. Seal the container and change out the used gloves. Spray away liquid waste with a water hose. You'll wash the floor more thoroughly later.

Step 3

Start from the top when cleaning. Wipe down, with disinfectant spray or a bleach-water solution in a spray bottle, surfaces that the dog can contact. Include all outside chain-link walls as well as the gate handle. Wipe solid walls down from top to bottom with bleach. Use bleach water on the ground and scrub with a clean broom, bristle brush or tough mop. Start from the back of the kennel and work toward the front. Rinse the bleach away with clean water from a hose or with the bucket. Squeegee the excess liquid away.

Items You Will Need

  • Disposable gloves
  • Goggles
  • Bleach
  • Bucket
  • Soap and hot water
  • Sponges
  • Mop
  • Squeegee
  • Water hose
  • Brooms

Tip

  • If you have more than one dog kennel, start with the ones holding the youngest dogs and finish with those holding the oldest dogs.

Warnings

  • Keep all cleaners up and out of reach of pets and children in tightly sealed containers. Dispose of waste products immediately, preferably outdoors. Always rinse out remaining bleach and cleaners before your dog returns to his kennel. Do not allow pets to enter the kennels until they have completely dried.
  • Sanitizing dirt floors is almost impossible; a kennel should optimally have cement flooring; even wood is difficult to keep sanitized.

About the Author

Dondi Ratliff is a certified secondary English teacher in Texas. Her articles typically cover topics regarding animals both wild and domesticated. Ratliff holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from Tarleton State University, a Master of Arts in teaching from Texas Woman's University, and a Master of Arts in English from Tarleton State University.