Deer & Potato Dog Food

by Deborah Lundin
    Deer meat is a good protein source with reduced calories and fats.

    Deer meat is a good protein source with reduced calories and fats.

    Chris Amaral/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Making homemade dog food allows you to provide a healthy balanced diet for your dog that caters to his likes and dislikes. Deer meat and potatoes offer a variety of health benefits. Using a slow cooker to make your homemade dog food enhances flavor and delivers tender meat.

    Benefits of Deer Meat

    Dogs need protein in their diets, as it provides them with essential amino acids they need for optimal health. Based on a 3-ounce serving, venison, or deer meat, has fewer calories and less fat than beef while also providing more protein. This is beneficial if your dog has weight issues. The lower calories still provide the protein he needs.

    Ingredients

    For a balanced homemade dog food, Founders Veterinary Clinic recommends a meat source, a non-meat protein source such as eggs or cottage cheese, a carbohydrate source such as rice or potatoes and a vegetable such as green beans, carrots or broccoli.

    Basic Slow Cooker Recipe

    For a basic recipe using a slow cooker, you will need 1 pound of venison, 1 cup of uncooked brown rice, 2 to 4 potatoes or sweet potatoes and 2 cups of chopped vegetables such as carrots or broccoli. Place 6 cups of water or beef broth into the slow cooker. Add the rice, potatoes and vegetables. Add ground venison or chop your venison steaks into bite-size pieces before adding. Turn your slow cooker on. At the low setting, this meal cooks for 6 to 8 hours. Adjust to the high setting for a cooking time of 4 to 6 hours. Allow the meal to cool before serving. Divide the remainder into serving sizes and store in the refrigerator for 3 days, or freeze for later serving. Serve alone or add to kibble.

    Considerations

    Consult a veterinarian or canine nutritionist before changing your dog’s diet. Go over your recipe and serving plans to make sure that you are meeting your dog’s nutritional needs. The veterinarian may recommend additional supplements. When you change your dog’s food, do so gradually to avoid stomach upset. While you may be tempted to add seasonings to this dish, do not add garlic or onions, as they are toxic to dogs. In addition, salt is not good for your pooch and isn’t needed.

    Photo Credits

    • Chris Amaral/Photodisc/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Deborah Lundin has worked as a professional writer since 2005, though writing has always been a passion. She brings a background in health and fitness, veterinary care, professional cooking and parenting. She studied medical laboratory science and sociology at Northern Illinois University. Sites published on include Yahoo, Physorg and MedicalXPress.

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