The Best Dematting Spray for Dogs

by Joanna Ehlers
Long-haired dog breeds are prone to hair mats.

Long-haired dog breeds are prone to hair mats.

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Many breeds of dog, whether they are large or small, are prone to developing mats of hair that may impede grooming success and detract from the dog's appearance. Trying to rid a dog's coat of hair mats can be uncomfortable for the dog and frustrating for the groomer or owner. Fortunately, a variety of detangling products can assist caregivers when removing mats from a dog's coat.

Mat Removal

Mats of hair can be damaging to a dog's skin, preventing it from receiving moisture and adequate oxygen. When deciding how to remove harmful mats from a dog's coat, owners or groomers must decide carefully how to go about the extraction. A dog's skin may be sensitive, and excess pulling on certain areas may cause him to become tender or sore. Extra caution should be taken with elderly animals, whose skin is thinner and more prone to injury. Should mats be prevalent on a dog's body, responsible handlers may resort to wet clipping techniques, according to the website groomingsmarter.com.

Detangling Safely

Dog grooming expert Barbara Bird lauds the use of detangling sprays, stating that they make dematting jobs much easier on dogs and their groomers. Using a detangling spray helps lubricate the hair shaft, making it easier to comb through. Less tugging on tender skin makes for a happier, more cooperative dog and less anguish for his groomer. Detangling sprays also can help preserve a greater quantity of hair that would otherwise be removed. Most detangling sprays, particularly those that are silicone-based, work best when applied to wet coats and then combed out when fully dry.

Silicone Sprays

When it comes time to groom a matted coat, many professionals rely on silicone-based sprays. Although they are not the only choice on the market, silicone sprays coat the hair with a sleek finish for easy mat removal. Some silicone sprays are formulated to work best when applied to wet hair and allowed to dry, while others can be brushed immediately after application. Most products made for pets use the same grade of silicone used in beauty salons, according to Grooming Smarter, and many of them condition hair, remove foreign objects, repel dirt and urine, and prevent static, which may contribute to mat formation. Sprays such as Quicker Slicker, Eqyss Survivor and Ice on Ice are just a few products that pet owners turn to when mats appear.

For Best Results

For the best results when using a dematting spray, experts recommend first bathing and conditioning the dog's hair. Once the dog's bath is over, a spray of the groomer's choice can be applied to trouble spots. Mats should be combed out after the dog's body is fully dry, according to Barbara Bird, since silicone works best after it dries. Silicone sprays are useful for removing mats, but overuse of the spray can cause a dog's coat to appear greasy. Silicone can create a slippery table or floor if it is sprayed in great quantities, so care should be used when application is necessary.

Photo Credits

  • Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Joanna Ehlers is a paraprofessional, equestrian and professional musician. She holds both a Bachelor of music-performance degree and a Master of music-performance degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

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