How to Determine Eye Color in Husky Puppies

by Kay Penster
A husky puppy eye's can be blue, brown or shades in between.

A husky puppy eye's can be blue, brown or shades in between.

Sheena image by AttitudeAngel from Fotolia.com

The Siberian Husky is a working dog originally from Northeast Asia, where it was bred to be a sled dog, according to the American Kennel Club (AKC). Husky puppies may have eye colors ranging from icy blue to dark brown, with variations in between. Dog breeders will usually have many puppies to choose from, if you have a color preference. For show dogs, the AKC standard states, "Eyes may be brown or blue in color; one of each or parti-colored are acceptable."

Step 1

Look at the husky puppies in natural sunlight, to see the true color of their eyes. A husky may have eyes that are different colors---check each puppy's eyes if you have a preference for same-color eyes. A husky is called "bi-eyed" if it has a brown eye and a blue eye. A "parti-eyed" husky has both brown and blue colors in each eye.

Step 2

Photograph the puppies so you will have a record of the eye colors. Blue and brown eyes have many different shades and it may be hard to remember them precisely. A photograph is a good reminder.

Step 3

Go to a bookstore or library to find a Siberian Husky breed guide with color pictures. Compare your photographs to the pictures and read the descriptions to determine what dog breeders call the different eye colors. Some breeders may call the brown shades gold or hazel.

Step 4

Check the online calendar listings of the AKC to find a dog show close to you. Go to a dog show, look at the Siberian Huskies in their crates and talk to the dog owners. Most exhibitors enjoy talking about their dogs and may have puppies with them, too.

Items You Will Need

  • Camera
  • Siberian Husky breed guidebook

Tip

  • The Siberian Husky looks similar to the Alaskan Malamute, another AKC breed.

Warning

  • Mixed-breeds are frequently known as "Alaskan Huskies." Pure-bred puppies are called "Siberian Huskies."

Photo Credits

About the Author

Kay Penster has been writing professionally since the 1980s. She has worked in print, radio, television and corporate video. Her credits include "Texas Scenes" magazine and media production for the Texas Department of State Health Services. Her work has also appeared in various online publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in communications and journalism from Hardin-Simmons University.

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