What Dogs Have Goatees?

by Leslie Carver
    Schnauzers have goatees.

    Schnauzers have goatees.

    Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    Some dogs have what appear to be beards or goatees. Most breeds with goatees have them for a reason, the goatees protecting their muzzles. This is because they were originally working dogs, and some still are. Goatees on Schnauzers, Black Russian Terriers and Flanders Cattle dogs protect their muzzles from harm by rodents they might catch. The Bearded Collie's beard is simply a result of his coat. Now, goatees add to the characteristic looks of these breeds.

    Schnauzers

    Schnauzers come in miniature, standard and giant. Regardless of size or gender, all have goatees, or beards. It is one of their distinguishing characteristics. The typical coat colors for Schnauzers are salt and pepper or black. In those with salt and pepper colored coats, goatees are typically gray. In black Schnauzers, goatees are black as well.

    Black Russian Terriers

    Black Russian Terriers have goatees as well. They also have mustaches on their muzzles, and bushy eyebrows. They are large dogs with thick, bristly, waterproof black coats.

    Bouvier des Flandres, or Flanders Cattle Dogs

    Bouvier des Flandres, or Flanders Cattle Dogs, are another bearded breed. Like, Black Russian Terriers, they are large dogs. They, too have bushy eyebrows and rough, weather-resistant coats. Underneath, they have soft undercoats. Their goatees are described as "shaggy" and "thick." They can be black, salt and pepper colored, fawn, blonde, gray or brindle.

    Bearded Collies

    As the name suggests, Bearded Collies are yet another breed with goatees. They are also known as "Beardies." They are medium-sized dogs. The name derives from the double-layered coat that hangs over the Beardie's entire body, including the chin. They are born black, blue, brown or fawn, with or without white markings, and often lighten, first fading to a light gray or cream as they grow up. The color of the coat changes multiple times before reaching the adulthood color. The final color is somewhere between the coat color of puppyhood and the coat color when the dog is about a year old.

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    About the Author

    Leslie Carver has been a professional author since 2009. Her work appears on multiple websites. She has an associate's degree in English with progress toward her bachelor's at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She has been awarded an Outstanding Student Award in English and twice nominated for creative writing awards.

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