How to Get Dogs to Stop Barking With Sounds

by Kimberly Caines Google
Your dog's excessive barking can quickly become a nuisance.

Your dog's excessive barking can quickly become a nuisance.

Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

If your cute, cuddly dog has turned into a noise-making terror, your neighbors are probably not happy campers. Your dog can bark for many reasons—maybe he's trying to tell you he needs more attention; maybe he's frustrated or maybe he just likes the sound of his voice. Whatever the reason, if your dog's barking resembles a broken record, verbal commands might not always be effective. In this case, use the power of sound. With persistence, consistency and lots of dog treats, Fido will go back to being your cute, cuddly dog.

Step 1

Fill an empty soda can with about 20 coins or small stones. Seal the opening of the can with sticky tape.

Step 2

Arm yourself with the can of coins and a bag of dog treats and wait for your dog to start barking. Alternatively, ring the doorbell or make another sound that you know triggers your dog's barking.

Step 3

Allow your dog to bark three or four times, and then shake the can of coins to interrupt and startle him. Don't let your dog see you making the noise—it should be an unexpected surprise that he doesn't associate with you. When he stops barking, wait three seconds before giving him a dog treat for being quiet. Avoid giving the treat right after he stops barking, because he might think you're rewarding his noisemaking behavior. Alternatively, throw the can of coins in front of your dog's feet—the noise and the sudden appearance of the can will startle your dog and interrupt his barking.

Step 4

Repeat this noisemaking tactic each time your dog starts barking. Over time he'll start noticing that the unpleasant sound interrupts him each time he barks and he'll stop barking to avoid it.

Items You Will Need

  • Soda can
  • Coins or small rocks
  • Sticky tape
  • Dog treats

Tips

  • Instead of a shake can, you can also clang two metal pots together; close a drawer with a loud slam; or use an air horn or a commercial device that emits a high-frequency sound.
  • Avoid yelling at your pet companion to get him to stop barking, because he might think you're joining in the fun.

Warning

  • Before trying to correct your dog's barking, consult a veterinarian, because sometimes barking can be triggered by medical conditions or injuries.

References

Photo Credits

  • Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Kimberly Caines is a well traveled model, writer and licensed physical fitness trainer who was first published in 1997. Her work has appeared in the Dutch newspaper "De Overschiese Krant" and on various websites. Caines holds a degree in journalism from Mercurius College in Holland and is writing her first novel.

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