How to Dye My Dog Pink Naturally Using Kool-Aid

by Sarah Emerald
    A white or light colored dog is a good candidate for Kool-Aid dyeing.

    A white or light colored dog is a good candidate for Kool-Aid dyeing.

    Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

    Any light-colored dog can be dyed using Kool-Aid, no matter what size or breed the dog is. Darker hued dogs can be dyed as well, but the color will be much darker than expected, or may not show up at all. Black, dark brown and dark gray dogs will not show much of a color change when Kool-Aid is applied. A small dog can be dyed in the sink; a large breed may require a kiddie pool or big tub. Your dog should be clean and dry before beginning for best results.

    Step 1

    Fill the tub or sink with warm water.

    Step 2

    Add the Kool-Aid and stir with a wooden spoon to blend.

    Step 3

    Place the dog in the water.

    Step 4

    Use the plastic cup to pour Kool-Aid over your dog's shoulders and back. The dye will work best is you can immerse your dog for 5 minutes; some dogs will enjoy this more than others.

    Step 5

    Drain the tub and refill it with warm water. Pour warm water over the dog to remove extra dye. Drain the tub and allow your dog to air dry on a porch or patio.

    Items You Will Need

    • Warm water
    • 5 packets of sugar free cherry or strawberry Kool-Aid (add 2 more packets if you have a very large dog.)
    • Wooden spoon
    • Plastic cup

    Tips

    • These directions can be used for light colored chickens, rabbits and cats as well.
    • A dog that already likes to be bathed will not resist the dyeing process.
    • It will not hurt your dog to drink the water; the Kool-Aid is edible and sugar free.

    Warnings

    • Expect the color to last for a few days or a few weeks, depending on the breed of dog and the intensity of the color.
    • Wear gloves to keep the dye off your hands.
    • Don't use dye formulated for humans on dogs, it could harm your pet.
    • If you have an acrylic tub or sink, use a baby pool instead -- the dye could stain your bathtub.

    References

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Sarah Emerald has been writing professionally since 1996. She is the author of books and magazine articles specializing in crafts, family, business and the home. Emerald's most recent books cover crafting, home-keeping and entertaining and Disney travel. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from a small private college in the southeastern United States.

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