Fried Chicken Skin for Dogs

by Naomi Millburn
    This stuff doesn't belong in your pooch's belly.

    This stuff doesn't belong in your pooch's belly.

    Jupiterimages/liquidlibrary/Getty Images

    Not many things excite a hungry doggie more than the wafting aroma of dinnertime emanating out of your kitchen. Despite the enticing smell of supper, remember that the vast majority of "human foods" just are not safe or suitable for your pooch, fried chicken skin being one of them.

    If you have some fried chicken skin on your plate, be sure to keep it far away from your pleading cutie's reach, no matter what. Although lean meats that are fully cooked usually are harmless for many canines, chicken skin is extremely high in fat and not only may trigger digestive distress, but also pancreatitis. The pancreatic inflammation disorder is risky and prevalent especially in dogs that are older or overweight, so take note.

    Fried foods in general just are a bad idea for dogs, notes the Prince George's County Humane Society. Whether fried chicken skin, french fries or fried shrimp, the greasy stuff often leads to tummy ache, diarrhea and throwing up in canines. Like the skin of chicken, fried foods also sometimes are responsible for the development of pancreatitis in pets. From the "fried" element to the "chicken skin" element, that may be a double whammy against fried chicken skin.

    If you feel guilty about not allowing your fluff ball to devour your leftover fried chicken skin, never try to overcompensate by throwing him a bone -- literally. Chicken bones can pose a serious choking hazard to doggies. Bones also sometimes break down into many tiny segments, and because of that can cause extremely dangerous internal organ havoc. No, thank you.

    Although fried chicken skin certainly is a "no no" for your doggie, certain other "human foods" may make totally appropriate "once in a while" treats for your pet. However, it is crucial never to offer your pooch any human food items unless you have prior veterinary approval. Some food items you may wish to mention to your vet include bananas, green beans, bread and plain pasta. The ASPCA indicates that those human foods may be harmless and healthy occasional snack options for canines.

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    About the Author

    Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

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