Are Full-Blooded Poodles Two-Toned in Color?

by Jane Meggitt Google
    She's a classic miniature white poodle.

    She's a classic miniature white poodle.

    Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    While purebred poodles come in a variety of shades, multicolored poodles, or entries who aren't solid-colored, aren't permitted in American Kennel Club conformation classes. They are allowed to compete in other AKC events, such as agility. The United Kennel Club allows two-tone poodles to show in conformation classes and performance events.

    The AKC makes no bones about it. Its poodle breed standard reads, "Parti-colored dogs shall be disqualified" from the conformation show ring. Permissible, solid colors include black, white, cream, gray, blue, silver, brown, apricot and "cafe-au-lait." The AKC does permit some darker shading of color at the ruff and ear tips but states that clear colors are "definitely" preferred.

    The UKC permits multicolored dogs. These poodles can be parti-colored, or another color with at least 50 percent white; abstract, another color with less than 50 percent white; phantom, a solid base color with another color on feet, above each eye, below the tail, or on chin, throat and chest; sable, or having black-tipped hairs on the coat; or multi-patterned, having more than one of these patterns. Multicolored poodle exhibitors in UKC conformation shows don't compete against solid-colored poodles, even though the UKC notes that they aren't separate breeds.

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    About the Author

    Jane Meggitt has been a writer for more than 20 years. In addition to reporting for a major newspaper chain, her work has appeared in "Horse News," "Suburban Classic," "Hoof Beats," "Equine Journal" and other publications. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English from New York University and an Associate of Arts from the American Academy of Dramatics Arts, New York City.

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