How to Give a Dog Dewormer

by Amanda Maddox
    Deworming, or "worming," helps keep your dog healthy on the inside and out.

    Deworming, or "worming," helps keep your dog healthy on the inside and out.

    Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

    For the most part puppies have some type of internal parasite at some point. As your puppy grows and becomes a dog, it is important to deworm him and kill the parasites. This protects your four-legged friend as well as the two-legged dwellers of your home since some parasites often seek human hosts as well.

    Step 1

    Visit your veterinarian and determine which type of wormer your canine needs. Several types of wormers treat various types of parasites. Fenbendazole, for instance, treats tapeworms, roundworms, hookworms and whipworms. A stool sample helps your vet determine which formulation is best.

    Step 2

    Administer the dewormer according to the veterinarian and manufacturer recommendations. It may be a perscription product or it may be available over-the-counter at pet stores, depending on the type and strength. They generally come in pill or paste forms that kill internal parasites.

    Step 3

    Measure the proper dose of the dewormer. For a paste, turn the dial on the tube to match the requirement for your dog’s weight. For pills, dosage is also measured by the dog’s weight; you may administer one, or a portion of one, or up to three.

    Step 4

    Tilt your dog’s head back and encourage him to open his mouth by placing one hand over his muzzle, your thumb and index finger on his top jaw, and applying pressure. When he opens his mouth, fold his top lip in over the top teeth to keep him from biting down.

    Step 5

    Place the dewormer in your dog’s mouth at the back of his tongue by pressing the dispenser for the paste, or by putting the pill toward the back of his tongue Immediately let him close his mouth -- and hold it closed until he swallows. Rubbing his throat up and down or blowing on his nose may help.

    Tip

    • Follow the recommended deworming guidelines set by your vet. Generally, a followup dose follows the initial after a set period of time. This helps kill any newly hatched parasites not previously killed.

    Photo Credits

    • Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Amanda Maddox began writing professionally in 2007. Her work appears on various websites focusing on topics about medical billing, coding, real estate, insurance, accounting and business. Maddox has her insurance and real estate licenses and holds an Associate of Applied Science in accounting and business administration from Wallace State Community College.

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