How to Grind Up Dog Food

by Elle Di Jensen
Grinding dog food makes it easier for young puppies to eat it.

Grinding dog food makes it easier for young puppies to eat it.

Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

Whether you're dealing with a puppy or a senior canine citizen, sometimes it might be necessary to grind up her kibble. Puppies who are very young or are losing their baby teeth might find it hard to gnaw on hard chunks of kibble. Dogs at the other end of the age spectrum might be losing their teeth, too or may start having digestive issues that make it difficult to digest dry food if it isn't chewed thoroughly enough. Whenever you find the need to grind up your dog's kibble, you can pulverize it easily enough using basic kitchen appliances.

Step 1

Measure out 1 cup of dog kibble, or the amount that equals one serving for your dog.

Step 2

Place the kibble into the food processor or blender.

Step 3

Put the lid onto the appliance and press the "grind" button. Make sure that the unit is switched to "pulse" so that you can lift your finger from the button every few seconds to stop the machine.

Step 4

Pulse the appliance off and on until the kibble is ground to the consistency you want.

Items You Will Need

  • Dry dog food
  • Measuring cup
  • Food processor or blender

Tips

  • Since the blades in blenders are at the bottom of the container, grind smaller amounts of kibble at a time than in a food processor. If you place a large amount of kibble in a blender, the pieces at the bottom will get ground to powder while the pieces towards the top remain intact.
  • Ground dog food is a useful ingredient for making dog treats. Just grind a cup of your dog's favorite kibble and combine it with a teaspoon of vegetable oil, two beaten eggs, 1/3 cup of water and a dash of garlic powder. Mold the mixture into 1/2-inch balls and drop them one at a time into 1 quart of boiling water that has 2 teaspoons of chicken bouillon added to it. Boil the treats for three minutes before removing them from the water. Allow them to drain and cool completely before serving them to your dog.

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Elle Di Jensen has been a writer and editor since 1990. She began working in the fitness industry in 1987, and her experience includes editing and publishing a workout manual. She has an extended family of pets, including special needs animals. Jensen attended Idaho and Boise State Universities. Her work has appeared in various print and online publications.

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