Home Remedies to Keep Dogs Off the Furniture

by Jean Marie Bauhaus Google
    Letting sleeping dogs lie wherever they want can result in damaged, stained and fur-coated furniture.

    Letting sleeping dogs lie wherever they want can result in damaged, stained and fur-coated furniture.

    Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Dogs can sometimes be a conundrum. We share our homes with them and make them a part of our families, but that doesn't always mean we want to share our furniture with them. Fortunately, you can keep them off without using chemicals or pricey store-bought solutions.

    You probably don't find the floor to be a comfortable alternative to your sofa, and neither does your dog. If you want to keep Fido off the furniture, provide him with a dog bed that matches the softness and support of his favorite chair. Make it clear to him that this is his own special place to be warm and comfortable, by praising and rewarding him whenever he uses it. He might just decide that he prefers his own bed to being on the furniture.

    If your dog still prefers the people seats to his own bed, you can try using scent to deter him from getting on the sofa. Citrus scents are pleasant to humans but highly unpleasant to most dogs. Try setting orange or lemon peels out in a bowl next to your dog's favorite piece of furniture. Vinegar, although less pleasant for humans, is another scent that dogs detest, and you can spray it on your furniture without worrying about staining or damaging it.

    Another simple deterrent is noise. Dogs generally dislike loud noises, and a soda can filled with pennies makes a terrible noise when shaken. Shake the can near the furniture whenever you see your dog going near it, or toss the can onto furniture several times in your dog's presence. This will help him build unpleasant associations with the furniture and make him more likely to avoid it.

    Of course, the only surefire way to keep Fido off the couch when you're not home is to limit his access to it. This might mean crating him during your absence, or closing off the room with doors or pet gates. If neither of these is an option, block the furniture itself by turning the cushions on end or stacking smaller chairs on top of them. Another option is to cover the furniture with a sheet or plastic to prevent your dog from doing any damage even if he does get on it.

    Photo Credits

    • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Jean Marie Bauhaus has been writing about a wide range of topics since 2000. Her articles have appeared on a number of popular websites, and she is also the author of two urban fantasy novels. She has a Bachelor of Science in social science from Rogers State University.

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