What House Meals Can a Dog Eat?

by Deborah Lundin
    Many of the foods and meals you eat are safe to share with your dog.

    Many of the foods and meals you eat are safe to share with your dog.

    John Howard/Lifesize/Getty Images

    If your pooch seems to turn up her nose at her dry kibble and would rather sit down and munch on your meal, there's a possibility you can share, with a few modifications. She can eat a lot of the same foods and meals that you do, however, you must make sure she's getting the necessary nutrients and not eating foods that could make her sick.

    Meal Options

    Dogs are natural meat eaters and thrive on a protein-based diet. Their systems process protein into energy easier than carbohydrates. If you are having a hamburger for dinner, an unseasoned beef patty with some cheese is a great option for your pooch -- but leave out the bun. For breakfast, a great option for both you and your pooch could be scrambled eggs or yogurt with a handful of fresh berries. A meat and veggie stew with a natural gravy served over rice can also provide a balanced meal option for you and your pooch.

    Spices

    Unlike you, your dog does not need additional spices for flavor. She is just as happy with unseasoned chicken as she would be with some salt and pepper. In addition, many spices can be harmful to her. Salt, garlic, onion and mustard seed, for instance, can be toxic.

    Foods to Avoid

    Most people know chocolate is a no-no for dogs. Other foods to avoid include avocados, macadamia nuts, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, chives and anything with alcohol or caffeine. Other foods you eat may not be toxic to your dog but can cause allergies. Some common foods that can cause allergies or stomach irritation in dogs include wheat flour, milk and dairy products and some meats. If you notice increased itching or gas from your pooch after serving a meal, you may need to eliminate that option.

    Considerations

    Feeding your dog homemade meals can be tricky because you need to make sure you're providing balanced nutrition. Sharing an occasional meal as a treat is also an option and allows her to eat a regular balanced diet as well. Before changing your dog’s diet, consult with a veterinarian or canine nutritionist to make sure you're providing her with everything she needs to be healthy and thrive.

    Photo Credits

    • John Howard/Lifesize/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Deborah Lundin is a professional writer with more than 20 years of experience in the medical field and as a small business owner. She studied medical science and sociology at Northern Illinois University. Her passions and interests include fitness, health, healthy eating, children and pets.

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