How to Keep a Dog From Chasing the Vacuum Cleaner

by Susan Revermann Google
    Your dog may perceive the vacuum to be a threat to you both.

    Your dog may perceive the vacuum to be a threat to you both.

    Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    Among many other interesting dog quirks, chasing the vacuum joins the ranks. Although it’s probably quite amusing to watch, it can make cleaning a bit of a challenge with a hyper, protective dog coming to save you every time you flip that switch.

    Training

    Step 1

    Train your dog to stay in one spot and not bark at the vacuum when you're using it. This takes time, patience and practice, but in the long run it’s worth it. Repeat these steps until he is conditioned to leave the vacuum alone.

    Training

    Step 2

    Have him sit by the vacuum without barking. Give him a small treat and praise when he stays where he’s supposed to.

    Training

    Step 3

    Move the vacuum a few inches while it’s turned off and offer a treat and praise when he doesn’t move or bark. Try moving it a bit farther next time.

    Training

    Step 4

    Turn the vacuum on for a few seconds, turn it off and offer treat and praise for good behavior.

    Training

    Step 5

    Attempt to vacuum the room in short bursts. Give him the treat and praise when he doesn’t try to attack the appliance. Just keep practicing this until he leaves the vacuum alone.

    Other Methods

    Step 1

    Use the vacuum at the end of the day or after a nice long doggie walk. Your pooch will have less energy to chase after the vacuum. Even better, if you have a spouse or child old enough to take the dog on a walk, have them take the pooch out while you’re vacuuming. If this isn’t an option, continue with the following tips.

    Other Methods

    Step 2

    Let your dog out to go potty before you start vacuuming. You don’t want to add potty accidents to the cleaning you’re already doing.

    Other Methods

    Step 3

    Put your dog in another room. Shut the door or block off the doorway to the room you will be vacuuming. This will keep the two separated as you work.

    Other Methods

    Step 4

    Move the vacuum with your body movements as if it’s an extension of your body. Do this instead of moving it just by the handle, as this may appear to your four-legged protector that the vacuum is attacking you and you’re fighting it off.

    Items You Will Need

    • Vacuum
    • Dog treats

    Tip

    • Be calm and persistent when you're training. Avoid yelling at him or giving up if it doesn't work right away. It's worth the effort.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Susan Revermann is a professional writer with educational and professional experience in psychology, research and teaching. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Washington in psychology, focused on research, motivational behavior and statistics. Revermann also has a background in art, crafts, green living, outdoor activities and overall fitness, balance and well-being.

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