How to Keep Dogs Cool During the Summer Time

by Lisa McQuerrey
    Don't let your dog get overheated when the temps are high.

    Don't let your dog get overheated when the temps are high.

    Jupiterimages/Polka Dot/Getty Images

    Dogs can quickly become overheated during hot summers, leading to heat stroke that can be deadly if not immediately recognized and treated. Take preventative steps to ensure your pup is cool and well hydrated, and take his comfort needs into consideration when planning outings and time outside.

    Your dog should always have access to a cool, clean water supply, regardless of the temperature. This becomes even more vital in the summer months when water can quickly evaporate from your dog’s outside bowl. Consider an automatic watering bowl that refills as your dog drinks the water, or use an extra large container and check it several times a day to make sure your pet still has plenty of water.

    Your dog should always have access to shelter from the sun and the heat. If you have an outside dog who can cool himself off in the shade of trees in your yard or under a porch or awning, that should be sufficient. Otherwise, make sure you provide a shelter area that is protected from the sun. Additionally, don't allow your dog to spend all day out in the summer heat. Give him regular access to the cool indoors to guard against potential heat stroke.

    Concrete and asphalt can get incredibly hot in the summer, and retain that heat even when the sun goes down. Don't leave your dog on a concrete pad in the summer, or take him for walks on hot surfaces without protecting the delicate pads of his feet. If you go for a stroll or run, protective dog booties can guard against paw burns.

    Just like people, dogs can potentially get sunburned if exposed to harmful rays for extended periods of time. This is more likely for dogs with extremely short hair or white hair. Talk to your vet about topical creams and sunblocks that are appropriate to use on your dog’s skin to protect him against potential sunburn.

    Don't exercise your dog for extended periods of time when the temperature is high. If you're hot and sweaty outside, your dog is probably uncomfortable, too. Signs of heat stroke include heavy panting and breathing, a bright red tongue and sometimes pale gums, as well as disorientation, vomiting and gastrointestinal upset. Reduce your dog’s temperature immediately with a cool bath, washing down his paws with cool water and packing his groin region and underarms with ice packs. Call your vet for further guidance.

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    About the Author

    Lisa McQuerrey has been a business writer since 1987. In 1994, she launched a full-service marketing and communications firm. McQuerrey's work has garnered awards from the U.S. Small Business Administration, the International Association of Business Communicators and the Associated Press. She is also the author of several nonfiction trade publications, and, in 2012, had her first young-adult novel published by Glass Page Books.

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