How to Keep Dogs From Destroying Trees & Bushes

by Sarah Dray
    Doggie having too much fun in the garden?

    Doggie having too much fun in the garden?

    Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Getty Images

    A little digging here, a little peeing there. Soon your garden is starting to look like a it was attacked by every single critter in the neighborhood. Whether the culprits are your own dogs or some others just passing by, take action now if you want to save your garden.

    Step 1

    Get a tree or bush cage and place it in the most "attacked" areas. If you can't find these at your local gardening or home improvement store, you can buy some chicken wire and build your own protective circle around the plants. Just make sure the wire is tall enough that your doggie won't jump over it to get to the tree.

    Step 2

    Scatter some red chili pepper flakes, tobasco sauce or cotton balls dipped in vinegar around the areas that are suffering the most. You can also form a circle around the bushes or tree trunks that are the most affected. Pepper will cause sneezing, and dogs seem to think vinegar is one of the most disgusting smells in the world, so they'll stay clear of both.

    Step 3

    Spread a thin layer of pine cones around the bushes or trees you want to protect. Because they can hurt when you step on them, dogs will avoid any areas that feel "prickly" on their toes.

    Step 4

    Plant some prickly or thorny plants around the bushes and trees you want to keep safe. Creeping juniper, purple berberis and juniper all have thorny or prickly foliage that would be very difficult -- and very painful -- to get through.

    Step 5

    Create a barrier around bushes and trees using potted plants. Just make sure you pick tall plants so Fido won't be tempted to climb into the containers to get through. This could be a temporary solution if you don't like the look of the containers around the bushes and trees -- as the dogs lose interest in the impossible-to-reach plants and move somewhere else, you can move the containers away.

    Tip

    • If the problem is stray or neighboring dogs getting onto your property, consider building a fence or wall to protect your plants. This might not be possible in all circumstances -- for example, if your bushes and trees are in front of the house, rather than in the yard.

    Photo Credits

    • Hemera Technologies/Photos.com/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Sarah Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including "Woman's Day," "Marie Claire," "Adirondack Life" and "Self." She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

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