What Keeps a Dog From Biting the Walls?

by Amy Brantley
Playtime can help ensure your dog gets enough attention and exercise.

Playtime can help ensure your dog gets enough attention and exercise.

Digital Vision./Photodisc/Getty Images

It can be hard to keep your cool when you come home and discover that your dog has decided that the walls make a good snack. Whether your dog is bored or teething, biting the walls may seem like a good idea to him. The good news is you don't have to re-home your dog or keep him confined while you're away. Through the use of products and training, you can end this negative behavior and prevent the need for further drywall repair.

Bitter Spray

You can spray bitter spray on the walls to prevent Fido from biting the wall. The spray is perfectly safe, but tastes terrible to the dog. You can also make a spray at home by using vinegar and water. Mix three parts water with one part vinegar in a spray bottle and spray the area. This method is 100 percent natural.

Entertainment

Dogs often chew when they are bored. By providing toys for your dog, he will be less likely to bite the walls while you're gone. Look for toys that will provide hours of interaction, such as puzzle toys that dispense treats. Leaving the TV on can also keep dogs entertained while you're away.

Chew Treats

Dogs, especially teething puppies, like to chew. Instead of having your dog chew the walls, provide chew treats for him to gnaw on. Long-lasting chew treats will keep the dog entertained, satisfy his need to chew, and provide a tasty treat.

Exercise

Exercise is essential for all dogs, but especially those who are overly hyper and act out. Take your dog for a long walk before leaving the house or play a game of fetch before bringing Fido inside for the day. Some dogs require more exercise than others. For example, the miniature pinscher is known to be destructive if not properly exercised.

Attention

Some dogs are destructive when they don't get enough attention. Remember that dogs are social animals and shouldn't be left to their own devices. Make time to spend with your dog each day, even if it's just cuddling up in front of the TV or going for a walk.

Training

Dogs who don't seem to respond to any other remedies may need training to help break the habit of biting the walls. Any time you catch your dog biting the walls, give a firm “no” and provide an appropriate chew toy. It doesn't do any good to yell or spank your dog. This will only stress the dog and could make the bad behavior worse.

Photo Credits

  • Digital Vision./Photodisc/Getty Images

About the Author

Amy Brantley has been a writer since 2006, contributing to numerous online publications. She specializes in business, finance, food, decorating and pets.

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