What to Look for in a Teacup Yorkie Terrier

by Mary Lougee
"When my hair is long enough I want a pink bow in my topknot."

"When my hair is long enough I want a pink bow in my topknot."

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A Yorkshire terrier, or Yorkie, as they are fondly called, is in the toy group of dogs. The American Kennel Club does not recognize a teacup Yorkie as a breed, only the Yorkie at the weight of 4 to 7 pounds as an adult. Teacup Yorkies are generally smaller than 4 pounds and can have health problems inherent in the teacup size. Regardless of size, Yorkies are a tiny package full of energy.

Yorkie Colors

A Yorkshire terrier is blue and tan, according to the American Kennel Club. The head is a rich, tan with all the hair from the ears, chest and front legs in the same tan color. A Yorkie body is blue from behind the head back to the tail. The shade of blue is dark, steel-blue, not silver-blue and has no tan color mixed in with the blue body. Yorkie puppies are a darker blue, which appears black, but they lighten as they age.

Yorkie Coat

An adult Yorkie has very long, silky hair that is perfectly straight. The coat has a natural part in the center of the back from behind the neck all the way to his tail. Puppies have bright, shiny coats, but may be soft and fluffy without an excess of shine, until their coat grows longer.

Tail Features

A Yorkie tail should be docked to a medium length with long blue hair on his tail that falls in a plume. Yorkies carry their tails slightly higher than their backs. If the tail is docked too long, it will droop, and if the tail is too short, it will stick straight up like a flag. The hair on the end of the tail is generally darker blue than the body color.

General Health

Compare all of the puppies in a litter to choose one about 12 weeks of age who is weaned and has the first series of vaccinations. A puppy or adult Yorkie should have clear eyes, clean ears that smell fresh, and a cool, moist nose without discharge. Yorkie ears stand straight up when they are alert, whistling or talking to a prospective dog will have them perk up their ears for observation. Watch the dog or puppy walk to make certain it has an even gait, though puppies sometimes stumble while gaining coordination.

Photo Credits

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About the Author

Mary Lougee has been writing for over 10 years. She holds a Bachelor's Degree with a major in Management and a double minor in accounting and computer science. She loves writing about careers for busy families as well as family oriented planning, meals and activities for all ages.