How to Make a Fiberglass Dog Pen

by Shellie Braeuner Google
Pens give puppies a safe place to play.

Pens give puppies a safe place to play.

black labrador puppy chewing image by Scott Slattery from Fotolia.com

Keeping a dog contained is a big job, even if it's a small dog. In the wild, dogs range over miles to track and hunt. Domesticated dogs still maintain that desire to explore and mark their territory. This can be a problem when they are marking walls and furniture. Keeping a dog contained inside or out can easily be achieved with a simple dog pen. Fiberglass makes a sturdy wall that is easy to work with and easy to clean.

Step 1

Measure the dog. Smaller dogs can easily be contained by a 2-foot pen, but larger dogs may need a taller wall. A good rule of thumb is to make the wall of the pen twice as tall as the dog.

Step 2

Put on the safety goggles.

Step 3

Measure the fiberglass board. Mark the board at 2-foot intervals, or twice the height of the dog.

Step 4

Cut four panels of board. Each panel will be 4-feet wide.

Step 5

Stack two panels. Drill a hole through both panels 3-inches from the top and bottom. The holes should be within 1/2-inch of the side.

Step 6

Thread spring links through the holes and tighten the threads. Repeat on both sides of the rest of the panels.

Step 7

Spread the linked panels to form a square in the desired location. Or double the instructions and create a larger play yard indoors or out.

Step 8

Unscrew the spring links, fold and stack the panels to put the pen away.

Items You Will Need

  • Fiberglass sheet 4-by-8 feet, 1 or 2 sheets
  • Safety glasses
  • Rotary saw
  • Drill
  • Spring rings, 8

Tip

  • Clear fiberglass allows light to reach the dog and gives you a good view of the dog's behavior.

Warning

  • Always use caution when working with power tools. Use safety goggles whenever using a saw.

Photo Credits

  • black labrador puppy chewing image by Scott Slattery from Fotolia.com

About the Author

Based in Nashville, Shellie Braeuner has been writing articles since 1986 on topics including child rearing, entertainment, politics and home improvement. Her work has appeared in "The Tennessean" and "Borderlines" as well as a book from Simon & Schuster. Braeuner holds a Master of Education in developmental counseling from Vanderbilt University.

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