How Much Time Does It Take a Dog to Go Potty After It Eats?

by Susan Revermann Google
    Puppies need more frequent potty breaks than adult dogs.

    Puppies need more frequent potty breaks than adult dogs.

    Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    Like clockwork, your pooch probably has his own after-meal potty ritual. Plan ahead and just make this part of his daily ritual. By being consistent about letting him out after he eats, along with other potty breaks, you can hopefully avoid indoor accidents.

    After Eating

    Due to the peristalsis that is part of the digestive process, a dog usually needs to go potty within 5 to 10 minutes after eating. This expanding and contracting of the digestive muscles gets things moving inside the pooch. Plan regular potty breaks after each meal.

    Other Potty Times

    Besides the after meal potty time, you should let your doggie out upon waking in the morning, after any naps or play time and right before bed. Puppies need to go to the bathroom more often than adult dogs. Let a puppy out every 1 to 2 hours during the day to avoid accidents until he is fully potty trained and is used to the routine. As a dog gets older, he won’t need so many bathroom breaks.

    Signs

    There are a few signs to look for to indicate it’s potty time. He may start sniffing the floor, appear to be restless or may return to an area that he’s soiled before. When you see him displaying these behaviors, take him out as quickly as possible to let him go potty.

    Procedure

    Take a dog to the same potty spot when you take him out. Don’t play during this bathroom time, as this will distract him from the business at hand. Praise him for going potty in the proper place – this positive reinforcement works better than punishing him for indoor potty accidents. Offer a yummy little treat when he’s done.

    How Long

    Take your pooch out to go potty and give him about 5 minutes to do his thing. If nothing happens, take him inside for 5 to 15 minutes and then take him out again. Repeat this until the job gets done.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Susan Revermann is a professional writer with educational and professional experience in psychology, research and teaching. She holds a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Washington in psychology, focused on research, motivational behavior and statistics. Revermann also has a background in art, crafts, green living, outdoor activities and overall fitness, balance and well-being.

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