Potato Skin Toxicity in a Dog

by Naomi Millburn
    Don't let your pooch have the run of the kitchen.

    Don't let your pooch have the run of the kitchen.

    Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Just because a certain food is tasty and innocuous to a person doesn't mean that it's OK for a dog. Potato skins, for example, can be extremely hazardous to your precious pooch, along with several other aspects of potatoes in general.

    Potato peels or skins consist of oxalates, which are compounds that can be extremely detrimental to canine health. Oxalates are capable of causing major problems in dogs' digestive systems, kidneys, urinary tract and nervous system. Like the peels, green-looking potatoes also have the oxalates factor, and as a result also are unsafe for dogs. Raw potatoes on the whole are often thought of as being canine hazards as well.

    If your cutie for whatever reason gets his paws on some potato skins and eats them, he might experience a variety of unpleasant and harmful indications of toxicity. These include loose and runny stools, throwing up, depression, fatigue, tremors and seizures. He also could experience heart arrhythmia, which is a condition that is characterized by issues with a canine's heartbeat, specifically beating especially slowly, especially rapidly or even bypassing some beats. Even if he shows no signs of a problem, get him vet care if you caught him eating potato skins.

    The green segments of potato plants are also a bad idea for dogs. The toxic compound solanine is part of the green segments of potato plants. If your dog eats lots of the green stuff, it could bring upon many potentially dangerous consequences, including disorientation, central nervous system issues, reduced appetite, diarrhea, feebleness, throwing up, widened pupils, severe sleepiness and shifts in behavior. Get emergency veterinary care if you notice any of these things in your pet.

    Apart from just potato skins, possible food dangers for dogs are seemingly endless, and because of that it's absolutely crucial to never feed your dog anything new unless you have confirmation from your veterinarian that it's 100 percent safe. Some of the many "normal" foods that can be a dangerous to your furry buddy are chocolate, avocados, walnuts, raisins, macadamia nuts, onions and the list goes on and on. Never take risks when it comes to your dog's health and well-being. Remember, your vet is just a phone call away.

    Photo Credits

    • Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

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