How to Potty Train Using Training Pads

by Cynthia Measom
    Training pads can prove successful for potty training your puppy.

    Training pads can prove successful for potty training your puppy.

    Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

    Perhaps you aren't at home during the day to take your puppy outside to potty or maybe it is insistent upon relieving itself in your house instead of when you take it outside. Whatever the reason, using training pads as a way to teach your puppy not to go on the floor can solve your problem. Once your puppy learns that the pad is the only appropriate area to potty, it will cease going on your floors.

    Step 1

    Designate an area for your puppy while you are teaching it to potty on the pad. If necessary, set up a baby gate to confine it to a certain area, particularly one with hard floors that are easy to clean.

    Step 2

    Spread training pads all over the surface of the confined area of floor at first so that the puppy won't miss its mark. If you just put one or two pads in the area, you can't expect the puppy to know that's where you want it to go.

    Step 3

    Remove soiled training pads and replace them with fresh ones as needed. Make note if there's a specific area the dog tends to relieve itself upon.

    Step 4

    Remove a training pad every three days, but not the ones that cover the areas the puppy seems to favor.

    Step 5

    Keep removing training pads every three days until there's just one left. Discard and replace the training pad as needed.

    Items You Will Need

    • Confined area
    • Dog training pads

    Tips

    • Always leave a fresh training pad in your puppy's area so that it can relieve itself appropriately.
    • Watch for signs that your puppy needs to potty, which include circling, pacing and sniffing. If it's not near the training pad when it shows the behavioral signs, quickly move it there to encourage it to use the pad.

    Warning

    • If your puppy goes potty on the floor once you have started removing pads, you may be going too quickly. Re-cover the floor and move at a slower pace--such as waiting an extra day--to give it time to adjust.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Cynthia Measom wears many hats. She's a writer and the owner and accountant of a nanny placement agency she founded in 2007. Measom received her B.A. in English from the University of Texas at Austin in 1997. She is currently pursuing a B.S. in business administration with a concentration in human resources.

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