Prazosin for Dogs

by Amy Jorgensen
    Medication can treat high blood pressure in dogs, but cannot cure the condition.

    Medication can treat high blood pressure in dogs, but cannot cure the condition.

    Comstock/Stockbyte/Getty Images

    Prazosin is an alpha blocker originally intended to treat prostate enlargement and high blood pressure in humans. Today, however, the same medication can be used to treat similar conditions in dogs as well. While Prazosin has been used by veterinarians for the treatment of canine health conditions, the FDA has not approved the drug for use on dogs officially.

    Canine High Blood Pressure

    Vets frequently prescribe Prazosin to treat high blood pressure in dogs. The chemicals in the drug cause vasodilatation, which means the blood vessels in the dog's body relax so the blood can flow through them more easily. As a result, the dog's blood pressure decreases and her heart does not have to work as hard. Some vets have also used Prazosin to treat canine congestive heart failure.

    Canine Urinary Conditions

    As an alpha blocker, Prazosin also can treat some canine urinary conditions. The alpha blocker works by stimulating certain receptors in the dog's body so they cause the muscles around the urinary tract, including those around the prostate and bladder, to relax. This relaxation makes urination easier. Consequently, the drug can be used for dogs who suffer from prostatic hyperplasia (an enlarged prostate), ureterolithiasis (stones that form in the tube connecting the bladder and kidneys), and urolithiasis (urinary stones). Always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your pet.

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    About the Author

    Amy Jorgensen is a writer and communications instructor from Indiana. In addition to 10-plus years working as a writer, she has been teaching writing and communication courses to college students for nine years. She has a Bachelor of Science in English, a Master of Arts in liberal studies and a Master of Arts in communications.

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