The Puppy Is Sitting Down While Eating

by Todd Bowerman
    Puppies often act in strange ways.

    Puppies often act in strange ways.

    Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    Puppies are in a constant state of learning, and this occasionally manifests in some strange and seemingly unexplainable behaviors. As your pup learns to interact with the world around him and works to understand your expectations of his behavior, he may develop some odd habits. Most of the time, something like sitting while eating is nothing to be concerned about.

    Some pups just enjoy sitting down for a good meal. It’s not necessarily a common behavior, but dogs generally do what they enjoy. If your dog tends to take his meals sitting down, it could just be a matter of personal preference. Much like humans, dogs tend to build habits based on what works best for them; this could include sit-down dining.

    Teaching your dog to sit before eating is an excellent method for building reliability and patience into the pup. However, this training process can sometimes confuse the dog, leading him to repeatedly stand and sit during meals. In these cases, it’s best to ignore any behavior beyond the original sit and leave him to figure out the rest for himself. The behavior will likely disappear over time if it's not reinforced.

    Tall dogs should not eat or drink from bowls sitting on the ground. Stooping down to reach these bowls can cause stress on their backs and necks. If you have a large breed puppy and he frequently sits or lies down to eat, it could be that stretching down to the bowl is causing him some discomfort. Switch to an elevated bowl and see if the behavior changes.

    It's always possible that curious behavior on the part of your puppy has something to do with a health problem. If your puppy has suddenly started sitting down for meals, it might indicate that he's experiencing some sort of distress. His back could be sore, his stomach upset or he could generally be feeling ill. If you are worried about the puppy and he seems to be showing signs of discomfort, take him in to your vet’s office for a full checkup.

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    About the Author

    Based primarily in Austin, Texas, Todd Bowerman has been working as a writer since 2004. He has provided numerous independent clients with ghostwriting and SEO copywriting services. Bowerman currently serves as editor-in-chief of Button Masher Online. He studied English at DePaul University.

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