How to Remove Latex Enamel From Dog Hair

by Rhomylly Forbes
    Dogs and wet latex enamel paint are not a good combination.

    Dogs and wet latex enamel paint are not a good combination.

    dog photo image by sonya etchison from Fotolia.com

    If you are remodeling your home and have a dog, it's inevitable that sooner or later your dog is going to get too close to wet paint. Despite owners' best barricading efforts, dogs instinctively know where to find a freshly painted wall or door frame in their territory. If your canine family member is now sporting fur covered with latex enamel in the shade you'd prefer to see on your living room wall, there are ways to restore your dog to his proper color.

    Step 1

    Catch wet paint quickly. If you've just seen your dog brush against wet latex enamel paint, grab her and head for the kitchen or bathroom. Wet the painted area thoroughly and wash with soap. Dishwasher soap will work, as will dog shampoo. Dry your dog with a towel once the paint is washed off.

    Step 2

    Soak out dry paint. If the paint has dried, try soaking the affected area with water and wash with soap. If that does not remove the latex enamel paint, saturate the painted hair with acetone (nail polish remover) for two minutes and wipe away.

    Step 3

    Brush the fur free. If the acetone doesn't work, gently brush the painted fur, taking care to work the brush bristles between the hairs that are stuck together. The dry latex enamel will flake off.

    Step 4

    Give him a trim. If your dog has long fur and nothing else will work, you can always clip the latex fur bits out of his coat. Try not to cut any more fur than necessary.

    Step 5

    Allow it to wear off. Dogs shed their fur constantly, which means if you do nothing, or if the above techniques don't work, eventually your dog will naturally release the painted fur and go back to her normal color. If your dog insists on licking the affected area, put a T-shirt on her until the paint is gone.

    Items You Will Need

    • Warm water
    • Soap
    • Dog shampoo
    • Towel
    • Acetone
    • Brush
    • Scissors
    • T-shirt

    Photo Credits

    About the Author

    Rhomylly Forbes has a bachelor's degree in communications from the University of Wisconsin-Green Bay. A freelance writer since 1997, Forbes has been published in A&U Magazine, Romantic Times Book Lovers, Old-Time Herald, and Celtic Heritage. She has been writing online professionally since 2008.

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