How to Repel Nuisance Dogs

by Kimberly Caines Google
Repelling nuisance dogs can save your lawn.

Repelling nuisance dogs can save your lawn.

Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

Although they're referred to as man's best friend, sometimes dogs can be man's worst nuisance. If your neighbor's dog or a wandering stray uses your lawn as his potty area, you might find daily smelly surprises, urine-burned brown patches and holes in your lawn. Constantly cleaning up and fixing your lawn is not going to make this problem go away. You must take steps to stop nuisance dogs from paying visits to your property.

Step 1

Install a motion-detecting sprinkler system in areas frequented by nuisance dogs. When a nuisance dog goes near the area, the sprinkler system detects his motion and activates. The dog will suddenly get sprayed with a short burst of water, which will scare him off. Over time, the dog associates the off-limits area with the unpleasant spritz of water and stays away from it.

Step 2

Apply dog-repelling granules along the perimeter of your yard. These granules are not toxic to dogs but they do dislike the taste. Apply the repellent at least once a day and always reapply it after rainfall.

Step 3

Discourage nuisance dogs with an electronic repelling device. These devices can be controlled manually or activate themselves by detecting the motion of the unwanted visitor. They emit a high-frequency sound that humans can't hear, but dogs can. The loud sound scares off the dog.

Step 4

Place a fence around your yard to make it inaccessible to nuisance dogs. Although this might be a costly affair, it's instantly effective and worthwhile in the long run.

Items You Will Need

  • Motion-detecting sprinkler system
  • Fence
  • Dog-repelling granules
  • Electronic repelling device

Tip

  • If the nuisance dog is that of a neighbor who walks his dog along your property, put up a sign that says to keep all animals and children off your lawn because it's been treated with pesticide. For his pet's safety, your neighbor might walk his dog elsewhere.

References

Photo Credits

  • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

About the Author

Kimberly Caines is a well traveled model, writer and licensed physical fitness trainer who was first published in 1997. Her work has appeared in the Dutch newspaper "De Overschiese Krant" and on various websites. Caines holds a degree in journalism from Mercurius College in Holland and is writing her first novel.

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