Are Rhododendrons Poisonous to Dogs?

by Susan Paretts Google
    Those flowers look pretty, but they're toxic to your pup.

    Those flowers look pretty, but they're toxic to your pup.

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    Rhododendrons are evergreen shrubs with colorful, showy blooms. Unfortunately, they are toxic to our canine companions. These decorative plants may add some pops of color to your yard, but just a little nibble of rhododendron could make Fido very sick.

    Rhododendrons and their smaller relatives the azaleas are members of the Rhododendron genus. These plants produce fragrant, tubular blooms in a variety of shades including red, purple, pink, white and yellow, according to the "Old Farmer's Almanac" website. Rhododendrons grow in generally temperate climates including U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 8. Although beautiful, rhododendrons and azaleas both contain a poison called grayantoxin, which is harmful to our canine companions, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals website. All parts of the plant contain the toxin.

    If Fido ingests as little as 0.2 percent of his weight in rhododendron matter, he'll become ill, the Pet Poison Helpline warns. Symptoms of poisoning include vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, gastrointestinal pain and a lack of appetite. If Fido ingests a large amount of your rhododendrons, he might experience tremors, seizures, blindness, high blood pressure and abnormal heartbeat, or possibly fall into a coma. Bring your pup to the vet right away if you suspect the dog has snacked on your rhododendrons so she can remove the plant matter from his tummy and provide supportive care.

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    About the Author

    Based in Las Vegas, Susan Paretts has been writing since 1998. She writes about many subjects including pets, crafts, television, shopping and going green. Her articles, short stories and reviews have appeared in "The Southern California Anthology" and on Epinions. Paretts holds a Master of Professional Writing from the University of Southern California.

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