How to Get the Smell of Dead Fish Out of a Dog's Fur

by Mary Lougee
"I smell salmon. No, I smell like salmon."

"I smell salmon. No, I smell like salmon."

Photos.com/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

You are not going into the house smelling like that, Scruffy! A dog can roll in stinky rotting or dead matter, but why? Their ancestors, the wolves, roll in dead things to mask their own smell for hunting purposes, or to put their scent on the items to mark it as their own. Pack animals also perform this smelly, rolling dance to bring the scent back to their pack and share with you, though this isn’t a delight for humans. Using a few household products can alleviate your olfactory senses and deodorize your pooch.

Step 1

Assemble your cleaning products for your fishy dog outside. Turn the garden hose on and wet his fur thoroughly.

Step 2

Wash your stinky dog with deodorizing dog shampoo. Scrub the shampoo into his fur down to the skin level. Rinse your dog thoroughly with water from the garden hose and bathe him again in the shampoo. Rinse your dog with ample amounts of water.

Step 3

Mix 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar with 1 quart of water. Pour the solution on your dog from the top of his ears moving backward to his tail. Massage the vinegar rinse in his fur down to the skin for about 5 minutes.

Step 4

Rinse your dog with water and dry him with a towel. Keep your dog outside until he dries naturally. If you use a blow dryer on a dog that encounters dead fish, you may set the remaining odor in his coat.

Step 5

Hold one hand over your four-legged friend’s eyes. Sprinkle baking soda on his head and his entire body working it into his fur. Rub the baking soda into all of his hair including his paws, the paw pads, his tail and exterior of his ears. Give your wayward pal a few dog treats to keep him still without rolling the baking soda off onto the ground.

Step 6

Brush your dog over his entire body to remove any excess baking soda. You may now let your non-smelly dog into the house for a long nap after his aggressive bathing and deodorizing.

Items You Will Need

  • Garden hose
  • Deodorizing dog shampoo
  • Apple cider vinegar
  • Bowl
  • Towels
  • Baking soda
  • Dog treats
  • Brush

Tip

  • Baking soda neutralizes odors to remove them instead of just masking them with deodorants.

Warning

  • Make sure not to get any bath products in your dog’s eyes or ears. You can place cotton balls in his ears to ensure they stay dry.

Photo Credits

  • Photos.com/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images

About the Author

Mary Lougee is a writer in Texas who writes on a wide variety of subjects from home improvement to pet care. Her love of animals led to building a farm and caring for rescue animals from equine and swine to dogs and cats. She holds a bachelor's degree in management.

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