How to Stop Crying Puppies at Night

by Sarah Dray
    Puppy not so cute when nighttime rolls around?

    Puppy not so cute when nighttime rolls around?

    Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    Puppy keeping you up at night? You probably didn't realize when you got him home that he was going to be just as much work as a crying baby. Which would be OK, except that you have to get up and go to work the next morning -- no maternity leave for the furry ones.

    Step 1

    Take a deep breath and try to understand what's going on. If this is the first night -- or even the first week alone with you -- Fido probably misses mom or his litter mates. He's suddenly in a new place, surrounded by people he doesn't know, and with no other dogs to curl up to. He probably just needs some time to adjust to the situation, so give him that if you can. A stuffed toy might help, just stick it in his crate or bed.

    Step 2

    Pick one sleeping place and stick to it. Don't put Puppy in the kitchen one day, then in a crate the next and then move him to the bathroom. Aside from confusing, moving location constantly can be scary. Do you allow your dogs to sleep in the bedroom with you? Then there's nothing wrong with bringing him to the bedroom on day one.

    Step 3

    Take the puppy out if you think he's crying because he needs to go to the bathroom. Young puppies have tiny bladders and they might need to go in the middle of the night to avoid accidents. This alone might solve the problem -- once he's back inside, he might stop crying since he doesn't need "to go" anymore. If you don't want to take him out, you will need to either teach him to use a pee pad or keep him in a crate -- dogs won't pee where they sleep.

    Step 4

    Let him cry, if all else fails. Puppies are like babies -- if you let them cry for a while, they'll eventually learn to soothe themselves and will stop. You might have to suffer through a couple of sleepless nights, but it will all be worth it in the end.

    Warning

    • Don't yell or scream at the puppy. You'll only make him more scared and stressed than he already is.

    Photo Credits

    • Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Sarah Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including "Woman's Day," "Marie Claire," "Adirondack Life" and "Self." She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

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