How to Stop a Dog From Getting in the Bed With You

by Tom Ryan
A comfy alternative is key to keeping her out of your bed.

A comfy alternative is key to keeping her out of your bed.

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While there's nothing wrong with sharing your bed with the dog, you reserve the right to kick her out. If sleeping together just isn't a good fit anymore, gradually removing her from the bed and giving her an alternative is the key to getting a good night's rest again.

Step 1

Give your persistent pooch an alternative to your bed. Now, your dog isn't stupid. She knows that a little doggie bed from the pet supply store is no match for your mattress, and she may resist. One big factor is the comfort of sleeping with her owner, so ease the transition by placing the dog bed up on an elevated surface so she can see you. Ideally, you should be able to reach out and touch her, but her bed should be far enough that she can't make the leap onto your covers.

Step 2

Make bedtime a routine for your dog. Dogs learn through consistency, and only through consistency. That means if you give in and let her sleep in your bed every now and then, all of your training is undone. With that in mind, establish a nightly routine for going to bed, so she knows the signs that the night is winding down and she's going to be retiring to her own, private bed.

Step 3

Reward her with a nighttime treat, like a special toy she only gets when she goes to bed. This distracts her at bedtime and also gives her a way to occupy that lonely time without you before she falls asleep.

Step 4

Lower your dog's bed gradually, if it is elevated. By this point, she should be used to sleeping in her own bed, so you want to slowly move it further away from your own bed until it's positioned where you want it.

Tip

  • If your dog is big enough to jump into the bed on her own, and can't resist doing so, make sure that she knows the "down" command and don't hesitate to use it. Remember, dogs learn by consistency. If she gets sent back down to the floor every time she jumps up, she'll get the picture and eventually stop altogether. Just make sure that she can't access your bed during the daytime, or else she'll just make her own rules.

Photo Credits

  • BananaStock/BananaStock/Getty Images

About the Author

Tom Ryan is a freelance writer, editor and English tutor. He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in English writing, and has also worked as an arts and entertainment reporter with "The Pitt News" and a public relations and advertising copywriter with the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

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