How to Stop a Puppy From Playing in Water Dish

by Sarah Dray
    Water bowl looking like a lot of fun?

    Water bowl looking like a lot of fun?

    Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

    Puppy trying to swim in the water bowl all the time? Or tipping it over the second you fill it up -- for the 100th time that day? Some dogs love water and will find any opportunity to get their paws wet. Others just like trouble -- and have fun making a mess whenever they can. Some dogs will outgrow their love for the water bowl, while others might need some help.

    Step 1

    Buy a metal water dish that comes with a rubber ring around it. These bowls are often designated as "non-skid" or "non-slip" bowls, but they have an added benefit -- they're almost impossible to tip over. Of course, that won't stop your puppy from putting his toes inside and playing splish-splash with the water, but if he realizes he can't spill the water anymore, he'll slowly lose interest.

    Step 2

    Give your pooch a bigger water bowl to play in. Keep the usual one where it's always been, so he can drink from there. Then place a large, flatter bowl outside and fill it with a few inches of water. Let that one become "puppy pool" for swimming, splashing and fun in the sun. Next time tries to play with the small drinking bowl, say "no" and take him outside to play with the big tub. He'll soon understand one bowl is not a toy while the other one is non-stop fun.

    Step 3

    Buy a raised food bowl. These bowls come with a metal frame and are usually designed for large breeds who have difficulty reaching the ground to eat or drink. Using it for puppy might solve the play problem, though, because it's impossible to comfortably put paws inside when the bowl is not on the floor. Just make sure you get something with an adjustable stand -- you don't want puppy to try to get on his tiptoes to reach for the bowl and send the whole structure down.

    Photo Credits

    • Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Sarah Dray has been writing since 1996. She specializes in health, wellness and travel topics and has credits in various publications including "Woman's Day," "Marie Claire," "Adirondack Life" and "Self." She is also a seasoned independent traveler and a certified personal trainer and nutrition consultant. Dray is pursuing a criminal justice degree at Penn Foster College.

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