How to Get a Tangle Out of a Dog's Fur

by Amy Hunter
    Regular grooming will keep your pup looking and feeling like a top dog.

    Regular grooming will keep your pup looking and feeling like a top dog.

    Kane Skennar/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Removing a tangle from your dog's fur requires patience while you work the knot loose, but in the end your dog's coat will look much better than if you tried to cut the tangle out or just left it to grow into a mat. As long as you take your time working on the tangle, you should be able to get it out without hurting your dog. Once you get all the tangles out, commit to regular grooming to prevent any new tangles from developing.

    Step 1

    Spray the tangle with detangler spray. Detangler sprays contain conditioning ingredients or silicone to soften the hair and make it slick, which makes it easier for knots to slide out.

    Step 2

    Use your fingers to pick the tangle loose. Start at either side and work toward the middle of the tangle.

    Step 3

    Use a comb to work the loosened tangle out. Metal combs, commonly called greyhound combs, work well for this process. These combs start with widely separated teeth, which get closer at the other end. This allows you to work the knot loose using just one or two teeth from the wide side, then run the side with the narrow teeth through the area to make sure you have any remaining snarls out.
    If there is still some of the tangle remaining, repeat the picking and combing process. Take your time, working the tangle out a small section at a time. If you rush, it is likely that you will pull your dog's hair, causing discomfort and making him less tolerant of the procedure.

    Step 4

    Comb through your dog's entire coat, making sure you get down to the skin, as many tangles form close to the skin.

    Items You Will Need

    • Detangler spray
    • Comb

    Tip

    • If your dog is very tangled, or very impatient, break the grooming sessions into 10-minute sessions over a period of several days.

    Warning

    • If the hair is severely tangled, take your dog to a professional groomer before you pick up the scissors and risk hurting your dog.

    Photo Credits

    • Kane Skennar/Photodisc/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Amy Hunter has been a writer since 1998. She writes about health and lifestyle issues and enjoys writing about hiking, camping, trail running and other outdoor activities. Her work has appeared in "Sacramento Parent," ASPCA's "Animal Watch" and other print and online publications. She is the author of "The History of Mexico" and "Tony Gonzalez: Superstar of Pro Football," aimed at young-adult readers.

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