What Type of Toothpaste Works on Dogs?

by Naomi Millburn
    Keep your doggy's teeth sparkly and clean.

    Keep your doggy's teeth sparkly and clean.

    Kane Skennar/Photodisc/Getty Images

    As similar at heart as you may feel to your beloved canine, that in no way means that her dental needs are similar to yours. Dogs should not be using human toothpaste ever, full stop. Before you brush your fluff ball's chompers, look for a tube of dog-only toothpaste.

    When it comes to selecting the right toothpaste for your doggy, pet supply stores are the way to go. Look for a toothpaste that is labeled as being specifically for canine use. Standard human toothpaste can lead to unpleasant tummy distress in dogs due to its fluoride content, so avoid using it for any reason. If a dog eats any fluoride, digestive irritation is just one of the many potential problems.

    Although you may associate toothpaste with refreshing flavors such as spearmint, peppermint and occasionally even vanilla, things are very different in the canine toothpaste world. Dog toothpaste usually comes in interesting flavors that are especially appealing to pets, such as chicken, beef, peanut butter and malt. What may sound "eww" to you may not seem that way to your dog.

    Enzymatic toothpaste is a common tooth care option for dogs. This kind of toothpaste may be convenient for dogs since it doesn't foam, and therefore is totally harmless to swallow. Rinsing off this type of toothpaste also isn't necessary, which is helpful if your dog is on the antsy side.

    If you're nowhere near a pet supply shop but still want to brush your dog's chompers to sparkling white perfection, the ASPCA recommends blending together water and baking soda. Not only will this paste thoroughly cleanse your dog's teeth, it will also be significantly cheaper than other pet toothpaste choices.

    Toothpaste isn't the only special pet item you need. When you brush your dog's teeth, opt for a toothbrush intended solely for dogs. Pet toothbrushes are usually a lot smaller than standard ones, and therefore are generally easier to maneuver around a dog's mouth. Small toothbrushes intended for child use may also be a good choice.

    Photo Credits

    • Kane Skennar/Photodisc/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

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