Do White Argentine Dogs Shed a Lot?

by Naomi Millburn
    The Great Dane: one of the forefathers of the protective Dogo Argentino.

    The Great Dane: one of the forefathers of the protective Dogo Argentino.

    Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

    Dogos Argentinos are big white dogs who hail from Cordoba, Argentina, in South America. The sturdy and stately breed came about in the 1920s, developed to go after big game -- think mountain lions and boars. Some of the numerous ancestors of Dogos Argentinos are Irish wolfhounds, bull terriers, Spanish mastiffs and Great Danes, along with a few others.

    About Dogos Argentinos

    Dogos Argentinos, also called Argentine mastiffs, are characterized by their snow-white fur, which is extremely short and soft in texture. Dogos Argentinos are between 23.5 and 27 inches high at the shoulder. Although their coats essentially are purely white, some specimens also feature other coloring on their heads -- specifically large black spots that encircle their eyes. Completely white Dogos Argentinos are more prevalent, however. These dogs generally display jovial and modest dispositions. Excessive barking is not common in them.

    Not Big Shedders

    Some breeds of dogs undeniably shed more than others, but Dogos Argentinos' shedding patterns are not immoderate or extreme. Although these dogs shed occasionally, managing it is not a tough or time-consuming task.

    Basic Grooming

    Basic and regular grooming can keep shedding in Dogos Argentinos barely noticeable. Since Dogos Argentinos have such short fur, they only require single brushing sessions per week. These pooches have substantial physiques, however, so it's important to not ever be impatient with brushing. For properly grooming these guys -- and thoroughly getting rid of any stray hairs -- curry brushes should do the trick. Curry brushes are readily available at most pet retailers.

    Another Element of Coat Care

    Dogos Argentinos are clean creatures overall, according to the American Kennel Club. Despite that, "once in a while" bathing is a good idea, especially if your pet got something sticky or messy into his fur. Aim to bathe your Dogo Argentino in three-month intervals. If he spends a lot of time outdoors, however, you might want to bath him a little more often. Always use a gentle shampoo specifically intended only for canine use. With routine brushing and occasional bathing, a Dogo Argentino's coat should look shiny and healthy. Routine brushing also cuts down on conspicuous tiny white hairs all over your home -- a good thing, for sure.

    Photo Credits

    • Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images

    About the Author

    Naomi Millburn has been a freelance writer since 2011. Her areas of writing expertise include arts and crafts, literature, linguistics, traveling, fashion and European and East Asian cultures. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in American literature from Aoyama Gakuin University in Tokyo.

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